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2 votes

Is Shab-e-Miraj considered a religious festival in Pakistan?

Sumi | 11 years ago

I've often seen people doing extra Ibadat on this day and I do not quite undersand it. Is it celebrated in a particular way? If yes, why?

What is Shab-e-Miraj?
This question has been edited by the user

Tags: Shab-e-Miraj  Religion  Islam 

Comments
In above comments Latifi and Iqbal said about 'Patakha Festival'. They are relating the wrong festival with 'Patakhas' as on Shab e Barat we, Pakistani usually have 'Patakhas'. As fire work is not permitted in Islam, still urban areas in general and rural areas in particular have 'Patakha Festival' on Shab e Barat.
Regarding Shab e Miraj, I think first we need to understand that celebration in Islam different than today's west celebration. In Islam Shab e Miraj is celebrated by Praying, Nawalfil, Mahafil e Naat, Darood o Salam, Pary to Allah to forgive our sins. We have sweet dishes like Zarda, Sawa'yyan and Halwa on this day. We're excited about this night because we have some time from our busy lives to pray.
Murtaza Awan | 11 years ago
o khuda ka banda! i only relayed the instance of time when i was 5-7 in kashmir. and at that time, the difference didnt seem to matter. i havent seen patakhas since then, either on shabe qadar or meraj. probably because its not prevalent in NWFP (where i have been living since then).
Ali Iqbal | 11 years ago
btw.. dont you think we have everything the otherway round... things worth doing on shab e qadr are done on Meraj.. :S
Ali Iqbal | 11 years ago
@Ali: yeah, I kind of have this feeling too - referring to the 'otherway round' part. :/
Sumi | 11 years ago
 

Asked by: Sumi | 11 years ago | Answers: 7 | Views: 5021

Answers

1 votes

Zainab Hussain | 11 years ago

Answered by: Zainab Hussain | 11 years ago

Comments
:) Exactly Zainab. I used to simply follow things, until I reached a stage where I started questioning things and kept asking myself why we do certain things. I see many in Pakistan still considering it a night of worship and I often get to hear: "Something is better than nothing. We are praying to Allah, so there is no wrong in it." Well, I am noone to comment on such statements - it is Allah who knows what is right and wrong. I only want people to start asking themselves questions and find solutions in Quran/Hadith. Traditions should not be confused with religion, thus with what Islam is really all about and what it preaches us.

As for the different Imams. It is only few years back when I was chatting with a Turksih friend of mine that I for the very first time was asked which school of thought I follow. I find it a bit confusing and still have not found any answer to it. I try to keep it simple for now: Quran/Hadith. If questions, read what those school of thoughts have to say and choose the one which makes sense to me. Not easy though. Do share with me if you discover something interesting. :)
Sumi | 11 years ago
glad to see you guys thinking and talking like that... its a rare occurance i tell you.. prepare to be labelled qadiani or wahabi (both are on the opposite ends of a scale though, but people tend to be too stoopid to realise that :P)
Ali Iqbal | 11 years ago
Well, shia sunni wahabi is an other whole issue...
Zainab Hussain | 11 years ago
@sumi I do the same now, and people in Pakistan actually think I'm not practicing Islam rightly becoz I dun go with these show off sorta activities. Seriously, I think if you do these unnecessary things, you're actually showing off and for me. religion is something that's between you and your God.
Zainab Hussain | 11 years ago
Ofcourse nobody has the right to poke others or 'coerce' them, physically or otherwise, into doing something they dont wana do. But 'religion is something that's between you and your God' is big blanket statement, and i cant imagine what its implication could be.i mean, maybe i agree with what you mean, but sometimes the play of words can point in some other direction.
Ali Iqbal | 11 years ago

1 votes

Murtaza Awan | 11 years ago


This answer has been edited by the user

Answered by: Murtaza Awan | 11 years ago

Comments
Murtaza, you can write here what you originally posted. Its a valid answer
Administrator | 11 years ago
I was trying something else, but I posted my here, then some where. Again it was at wrong place I think so?
Murtaza Awan | 11 years ago

1 votes

Naveed Javed | 11 years ago


This answer has been edited by the user

Answered by: Naveed Javed | 11 years ago

Comments
I can see it's significance as it marks a certain journey, but is it specifically mentioned in Quran or any Hadith that this night should be a night of worship? If so, could you please share that passage/Hadith too? I feel that many of us follow certain things because our elders used to do it and do not bother to dig deeper. If it is a night of worhship, it will be a loss to ignore it, but if it is just like any other night, then it is different.

Thank you for your reply!
Sumi | 11 years ago
I guess this would help you! Source: Wikipedia!

The Lailat al Miraj (Arabic: ???? ????????, Lailätu 'l-Mi‘r??), also known as Shab-e-Miraj (Persian: ?? ?????, Šab-e Mi'râj) in Iran, Pakistan, India and Bangladesh, and Miraç Kandili in Turkish, is the Muslim festival celebrating the Isra and Mi'raj. Some Muslims celebrate this event by offering optional prayers during this night, and in some Muslim countries, by illuminating cities with electric lights and candles. The celebrations around this day tend to focus on children and the young. Children are gathered into a mosque and are told the story of the Isra and Mi'raj. The story focuses on how Muhammad's heart was purified by an archangel (Gabriel) who filled him with knowledge and faith in preparation to enter the seven levels of heaven. After prayer (Salah, where the children can pray with the adults if they wish) food and treats are served.[3][11][12] Esoteric interpretations of Islam emphasise the spiritual significance of Mi'raj, seeing it as a symbol of the soul's journey and the potential of humans to rise above the comforts of material life through prayer, piety and discipline.[4]
The exact date of the Journey is not clear, but is celebrated as though it took place before the Hijra and after Muhammad's visit to the people of Ta’if. It is considered by some to have happened just over a year before the Hijra, on the 27th of Rajab; but this date is not always recognized. This date would correspond to the Julian date of February 26, 621, or, if from the previous year, March 8, 620. In Shi'a Iran for example, Rajab 27 is the day of Muhammad's first calling or Mab'as.
[edit]Qur'an and hadith

The event of Isra and Mi'raj are referred to briefly in the Qur'an. For greater detail, they have been discussed in supplemental traditions to the Qur'an, known as hadith literature. Within the Qur'an itself, there are two verses in chapter 17, which has been named after the Isra, and is called "Chapter Isra" or "Sura Al-Isra". There is also some information in Sura An-Najm, which some scholars say is related to the Isra and Mi'raj.[13]
Of the supplemental writings, hadith, two of the best known are by Anas ibn Malik, who would have been a young boy at the time of Muhammad's journey.
[edit]Qur'an
Glory to (Allah) Who did take His servant for a Journey by night from the Sacred Mosque to the farthest Mosque, whose precincts We did bless,- in order that We might show him some of Our Signs: for He is the One Who heareth and seeth (all things).
—Qur'an, Sura 17 (Al-Isra) ayah 1[2]
Behold! We told thee that thy Lord doth encompass mankind round about: We granted the vision which We showed thee, but as a trial for men,- as also the Cursed Tree (mentioned) in the Qur'an: We put terror (and warning) into them, but it only increases their inordinate transgression!
—Qur'an, Sura 17 (Al-Isra) ayah 60[14]
For indeed he saw him at a second descent,
Near the Lote-tree beyond which none may pass:
Near it is the Garden of Abode.
Behold, the Lote-tree was shrouded (in mystery unspeakable!)
(His) sight never swerved, nor did it go wrong!
For truly did he see, of the Signs of his Lord, the Greatest!
—Qur'an, Sura 53 An-Najm, ayat 13-18[13]
[edit]Hadith
Narrated Jabir bin 'Abdullah:
That he heard Allah's Apostle saying, "When the people of Quraish did not believe me (i.e. the story of my Night Journey),
I stood up in Al-Hijr and Allah displayed Jerusalem in front of me, and I began describing it to them while I was looking at it."
—Collected by Muhammad al-Bukhari, Sahih al-Bukhari, Volume 5, Book 58, Number 226[15
Naveed Javed | 11 years ago
Ok I read all of it, as Sumi said, I couldn't find references that recommend it to be a night of worship or prove it through Sunnah
Usama Hafeez | 11 years ago
will do some more research and will get back to you guys for sure!
Naveed Javed | 11 years ago
It's mentioned on Quran but We don't really find any hadith where its mentioned that its a night of worship, I live in Saudi and if it was, they shud do special prayers in mosques. it's not a night of worship like we have the last Ashara'h of Ramadan, not it's an Islamic festival like Eid, it's a night where a special event took place. See --> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=52P6exky9CE&feature=related
Zainab Hussain | 11 years ago

1 votes

Nabeha | 11 years ago

Answered by: Nabeha | 11 years ago

0 votes

Faiq Latifi | 11 years ago

Answered by: Faiq Latifi | 11 years ago

Comments
like i have said in my post, it has esoteric significance... which means, by making this statement, i know what it is..
Ali Iqbal | 11 years ago

0 votes

Khawaja Naveed Haider | 11 years ago

Answered by: Khawaja Naveed Haider | 11 years ago

-1 votes

Ali Iqbal | 11 years ago

Answered by: Ali Iqbal | 11 years ago

Comments
o yeah! and hence the neighbor :)
i still get confused.. Confoederatio Helvetica.. cant they just simply say SZ or somefin.. O why O why do they still TRY to stick to latin.. even the modern scientists have given up coining greek and latin terms. :/
how long have you been in Swiss land.
Ali Iqbal | 11 years ago
Well, a -1 is from me...!!
Faiq Latifi | 11 years ago
XD
Ali Iqbal | 11 years ago
@Ali Iqbal Mate This was Shab e Mairaaj! There's no tradition of blowing patakhas in this vary night! The one you're referring to is Shab e Baraat!
Naveed Javed | 11 years ago
o yeah! thanks for the reminder.. but as kids, we didnt care, nobody knew the difference.. we used to live in the residential area of the CMH in muzaffarabad.. and almost every non adult there at that time was a kid of my age +-1 year..
Ali Iqbal | 11 years ago